Prove you're you.

Discussion in 'The Tearoom' started by classic33, Dec 24, 2017.

  1. classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Not as easy as it sounds. So how would you go about it?

    Disclaimer on birth certificates say that they are not a proof of identity.
     
  2. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Depends on the acceptable evidence and weight of it.

    I have lots of official stuff with my name on which, taken together, ought to persuade someone I am who I who I say I am.

    A bank statement, on its own, might not convince anyone.

    But add 20-odd years as a PAYE employee, the electoral roll, council tax, deeds at the Land Registry and a dozen other things with my name on in my possession, and you have a fairly strong case.
     
  3. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    It might not be that easy. Birth certs can be bought online as can marriage certs. These can be used to get passports and driving licences i suspect. But different agencies and companies all want different docs to prove you are who you say you are.

    Social security numbers, plus household bills, plus passports, driving licences are the best bet, but i daresay someone, somewhere could always say that the items you provide as proof might not be enough.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  4. Bromptonaut

    Bromptonaut Rohan Man

    Most organisations such as banks want proof of ID and proof of residence. Passport, Driving Licence, Employer ID etc are examples of first. Utility bills or bank statements were traditionally used for second. Now getting difficult as people and organisations go paperless. Had to jump through these hoops recently for Solicitor administering my late Mother's estate, fortunately the Council Tax Bill is in my name.
     
  5. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    I had to provide proof of identity not long ago. My view was " more is good" so i sent just about everything i had. My reasoning was that rhere was nothing else i could send because they had just about everything, therefore they couldn't possibly ask me for anything else. It worked.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  6. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Banks require proof of address. Passport driving licence usually require a copy of a birth certificate, which carries the disclaimer that it is not a proof of identity.

    Electotal Roll, doesn't really prove anything more than at the time it was compiled, the address concerned had the people named registered as living there.
     
  7. Jezza

    Jezza Regular Member

    I chopped in some scrap gold against a prezzie for MrsJ a few weeks past. Jeweller asked for proof of identity then I had to sign a certificate saying that the scrap gold was mine to sell. Driving licence card was fine.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    I'd to return a driving licence last year. That someone else applied for.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Main reason for starting this thread was the driving licence applied for and issued in my name, last year. This isn't the first one either. There's also a passport issued in my name. On both one minor detail was missed out on the applications, long term disability, means I can't drive. Somehow that slipped through, despite the marker I'd been told had been placed against any further applications in my name. The passport was last heard of in Germany, having flown from Spain along with whoever had it.

    I've two bank accounts with the same bank, different branches, Skipton & Sowerby Bridge. Opened with a quarter million in cash, in each branch. No-one thought either was odd in anyway. I'm told everything was checked and found to be correct. I've driven a car away from a high-end car dealer in Manchester. Went over and offered to take the manager for a spin aroind the block, in one of their cars. The minute I asked which was the brake pedal he got out.

    I've had three seperate NI Numbers, only one of which I knew about. With wages being paid to all three of me at the same time, according to HMRC.
     
  10. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    All i can say is, you are definitely unlucky, or lucky if you can get your hands on the money in the bank.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  11. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Unlucky, in one case, as it was my employer who sought and got the other two NI Numbers they used. They even had the books showing three separate wages being paid. Only one to my account though.
     
  12. Bromptonaut

    Bromptonaut Rohan Man

    Passport checks go way beyond birth certificate which is just part of a chain of investigations.

    I got my provisional driving licence in 1976 when (IIRC) they wanted little more than my birth certificate. Passed test, got full licence and moved 10 times with no obvious checks on paper version. But when I got a photocard a few years ago it was MUCH easier if I linked it to my passport.
     
    Welsh dragon likes this.
  13. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    Please correct me if i am wrong, but i am sure i read somewhere that banks have been told by the government that they will have to ask people for identification when they open bank accounts in the near future.

    I mean things like passports.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Official Photo ID and proof of address.
    Account opened this week using one letter from another bank.
    Birth certificates carry the disclaimer that they are not a proof of idenitity.
    And if you've had any documents certified by the post office they can't be used either.
     
  15. Bromptonaut

    Bromptonaut Rohan Man

    I'm not clear why you're repeating that. Birth Cert is proof of where/when a birth occurred. When applying for a passport it is required to be produced. It's PART of a suite of checks used to verify a passport applicant's identity.
     
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