Sea Port Security

Discussion in 'Motoring and Transport' started by classic33, Jun 21, 2018.

  1. classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Why are sea ports not treated in the same way as airports when it comes to security?

    A few years ago, travelling by coach and whilst waiting to board, I walked freely around the inner fence area. Even up and onto the boarding ramp of one of the vessels, taking photographs. I did have a letter from the port owners saying I could, otherwise I'd not have done any. My only protection in this area being a Hi-Vis vest, of my own.

    Being the early hours, the flash was spotted(be hard miss it really), and two port workers in a car came out and asked me what I thought I was doing. Simple answer of taking photographs, what does it look like, had them saying okay before getting back into their car and driving off. No amber beacon used going away.

    All the relative paperwork had been sought and got. The letter from the port owners being carried by me. At the time waiting to board the largest vessel of its kind in europe, with two smaller ones nearby.

    Try walking out onto the apron at an airport and doing the same. So why not the same level of security?
     
  2. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    People that are scared of flying use ferries and cruise ships. Rich people also like to go on cruises as well. ^_^
     
    classic33 likes this.
  3. Big Andy

    Big Andy Senior Member Staff Member

    So do poor people.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Bit hard to fit a coach on a plane these days, let alone three or four.

    If you were seen trying to walk upto an aircraft, 200-300 passengers, at night the chances are you'd never get to the aircraft. You'd be stopped. Yet to walk upto a vessel that holds 10 times as many, the answer "taking photographs, what does it look like?" was sufficient for port security. Why?

    As for "rich people using aircraft", O'Leary and Co. don't seem to be targetting those in any of his adverts. You've to be careful these days if you're a plane spotter.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    As I said,
    Supposed to be the most secure area within a port.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    The owners don't hand out that sort of paperwork to just anyone. Feel free to explain why it's not the most secure area within a port. Inside the inner fence.

    Then explain your reasoning.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Walked on boarding ramp on one vessel, unchallenged. The only real "challenge" being the port workers, who left after having their question answered. All conducted verbally, within a distance of no less than 50 feet.

    If that's in resply to why being inside the inner fence isn't the most secure area, within a port, it's not a very good answer.

    Question remains why are sea ports not as well secured as airports?
     
  8. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    And as you said the rich fly. Are you now saying that US armed forces protect ports?

    But you've already said,
    Is this where the US armed forces are now, guarding your food.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Explain, in english, what the above has to do with either the thread or in answering the questions asked.

    Again you muddy the waters.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Owned by a german company.

    Further muddying of the waters.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    In May 2016, Bayer offered to buy U.S. seeds company Monsanto for $62 billion. Shortly after Bayer's offer, Monsanto rejected the acquisition bid, seeking a higher price. In September 2016, Monsanto agreed to a $66 billion offer by Bayer.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayer

    You really should check what you post. Then maybe it'll have some relevance to the actual thread.

    In 1943, the U.S. Department of the Army contracted the botanist and bioethicist Arthur Galston, who discovered the defoliants later used in Agent Orange, and his employer University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana to study the effects of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T on cereal grains (including rice) and broadleaf crops.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2018
  12. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    What you post has nothing to with the thread. It's incorrect and misleading as well.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Senior Member

    Please explain what the above has to port security, if you're reporting on thread facts.
     
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