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Social mobility

Discussion in 'Society, Culture and Politics' started by Welsh dragon, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Well-Known Member Staff Member

    A new study shows that social mobility isn't worse in the northern part of England, but can effect every area and county in the country. I have no doubt that some people will continue to believe old myth though.

  2. Jezza

    Jezza Regular Member

    Social mobility went west along with free Grammar Schools.
  3. Bromptonaut

    Bromptonaut Rohan Man

    I don't think there's much evidence to support that.
  4. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Active Member Staff Member

    At the risk of appearing dense, is it better to be towards the top of the list or at the bottom of it?
  5. OP
    Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Probably somewhere In the middle. ^_^
  6. OP
    Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Well-Known Member Staff Member

    I think it just shows that every area can have the same social mobility and that it isn't confined to the North.
  7. DarkMist

    DarkMist Guest

    What is the old myth?
  8. OP
    Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Well-Known Member Staff Member

    A myth, perception that the north of England has less social mobility than other areas.
  9. Bromptonaut

    Bromptonaut Rohan Man

    While the article liked at OP shows there are areas of poor social mobility throughout England I don't think it comes near to refuting idea that it is concentrated in the north

    The BBC chart is based on geography rather population but undoubtedly shows that greatest social mobility is in London and SE. With exception of Thanet, Chichester and Horsham there are no significant areas where mobility is low in that region. OTOH there are huge clusters of low mobility in areas north of the Severn/Wash line including large towns and cities. The areas of high mobility in the north look big but are mostly rural areas with low population density such as Craven, Hambleton and the East Riding. The respective positions of Hull and it's surrounding hinterland are particularly instructive.

    And in other news the entire Milburn Commission has resigned citing failure of government to show real commitment and inability to follow up any promises it could make because of the bandwidth taken up by Brexit.


    EDIT: 10:55 to add head note summarising my conclusion.
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017