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When to stop celebrating the past?

Discussion in 'Society, Culture and Politics' started by classic33, Mar 4, 2018.

  1. classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Is the time to stop "celebrating an event" when you no longer know what it is you're actually celebrating?

    TV programme earlier this week, the presenter asked a few local people what they were celebrating. Answers given included "Not a f***ing clue", young lad. And "Our nations history", follow-up question was "what part specifically" answered with "No idea, but we have every right to celebrate it".

    How many these days know what Guy Fawkes Night*(Bonfire Night) is actually about?

    *The last man with honest intentions to enter the Houses of Parliment.
     
  2. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member

    Depends on what we are celebrating. I agree few people seem to know the background to the Guy Fawkes rebellion, but that is more down to schools and what kids are taught nowadays isn't it.

    I am often appalled at my grandchildrens seemingly lack of knowledge of history, geography and other subjects. Whole chunks of British history are not taught now. It is almost like they don't exist.

    The 5th of November should be a reminder to people of the intolerance that Britain once had towards others of a different religion. Sometimes you need to visit the past to help (hopefully) ensure that we don't make the same mistakes again (although we do and are i suspect).

    I don't think we should stop celebrating things like that, but maybe a bit of education could go a long way. I do wonder what kids are being taught these days though.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    I speak to people my own age who don't appear to know either, some were even in the same schools.
     
    Welsh dragon likes this.
  4. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    Some people are not the sharpest tools in the box.^_^. There are probably lots of reasons why people have no idea of certain things.
     
  5. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    I thought you were speaking specifically about the younger generation. History as we knew it isn't taught anymore. If my memory is correct we were taught about british history, the Commomwealth, the wars, and American history. These days it is much more generalised. IE. Signifigent people from the living past, special events like the first plane, important figures from the past.

    That leaves the whole subject wide open to interpretation. I do know that people these days seem to have little or no knowledge of a lot of British history. Schools trying to be too general seem to miss so much and not only where history is concerned. My grandaughter though Peru was in Europe. She had no idea about anything to do with the American continent.

    As for older people, i suspect the reason why they don't know or remember the same things you do or were taught is very varied. There won't be a simplistic answer.

    But i don't think we should stop celebrating events even if some people do not know the history behind the celebrations.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Celebrating it even if you don't know what it is you're celebrating, or why?
     
  7. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    Maybe more emphasis should be made to tell the story or a short version when people go to displays. That might help.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Not just down to the one event. I was meaning in a more general sense, using Guy Fawkes Night as an example.
     
  9. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    What would you do? Stop them?
     
  10. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Under the names used at present, yes. Requires education for that to work.

    Should "because we've always done it" become the get out clause. If you don't know what it is you're celebrating, what are you actually celebrating?
     
  11. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    Should we stop it because a few don't know why they are celebrating an event?
     
  12. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    That or rename it. If you don't know what it is, then a new name might be more appropriate.
     
  13. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    That doesn't make sense. If you are going to re name it, then you might as well stop it altogether. There are plenty of things we celebrate from the dim nd distant past without knowing why we do it. Stonehenge for instance and what people percieved to be what stonehenge was used for. We have diddly squat knowledge of what it actually meant, or what happened there. All very pseudo psycho babble in reality, but people enjoy it.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Well-Known Member

    Stonehenge, like Newgrange and similar sites, only a select few are allowed there to celebrate the event(s). It's also at a specific location, and time.
     
  15. Welsh dragon

    Welsh dragon Senior Member Staff Member


    I don't think that matters. They are still celebrating events that they don't know took place. Celebrating in a way that they don't know existed or actually took place. Numbers don't really matter in that context.
     
    classic33 likes this.